Neighbourhood Plan

What is a Neighbourhood Plan?

The Neighbourhood Plan for Newmarket will contain a set of policies aimed at managing change and growth in the town. It is a positive way in which the local community can shape how the town grows so that the character of and quality of life within Newmarket are maintained or even improved.

The Neighbourhood Plan will sit alongside the District Council’s Local Plan. The District Council’s Local Plan will set out the strategic policies for planning for the whole of the District of Forest Heath.

The power to prepare a Neighbourhood Plan and the various rules and criteria are set out in the Localism Act and the National Planning Policy Framework.

Who is responsible for the preparation of the Newmarket Neighbourhood Plan?

Newmarket Town Council has set up a Neighbourhood Plan Steering Group. The Steering Group consists of Town Councillors, residents and business owners with an interest in the future of Newmarket. The Steering Group meets on a monthly basis and reports directly to the Town Council.

Get Involved

Localism isn’t about top down government. It is about us telling them what we want for our town.

Greg Clarke, Minister for Planning, has written in his foreword to the National Planning Framework (NPPF) that “we are allowing people and communities back into planning”. The Newmarket Neighbourhood Plan is our chance to have an important role in the planning process, with policies which must be taken into account by law.

However, for us to arrive at policies which best reflect what people in the town need and want, we need you to get involved. Don’t be one of those who say in a year’s time “who agreed to that?”

Consultation Workshops will be organised in the Wards within Newmarket. The dates of the workshops will be publicised on this website – so please look out for them.

Send your views to the NP Working Group

Email:          newmarketnhp@btinternet.com

Write:          Newmarket Town Council, Memorial Hall, High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk,     CB8 8JP

 

First Step

One of the first steps in producing a Neighbourhood Plan is identifying the Designated Area to which the plan will apply once adopted. We are pleased to announce that following an extensive consultation process, Newmarket Town Council has resolved that the Designated Area will encompass the official town boundary with the exception of the Exning Cemetery located at Cemetery Hill. The application form to designate the area has been submitted to Forest Heath District Council, who will now carry out their own four week public consultation to give members of the public a further chance to have their say. This public consultation is due to take place at the beginning of November for a period of four weeks - so please look out for the consultation and please submit your comments directly to FHDC.

 

Second Step

Following the success of the public consultation held on the Objectives for the Newmarket Neighbourhood Plan, further public consultations will be held as follows:-

 

Monday 30th November 2015 from 10.00am to 2.00pm at Tattersalls

Tuesday 1st December 2015 from 10.00am to 2.00pm at the Guineas Shopping Centre

 

If you wish to view the 'Draft Objectives' please click on the tab titled 'Draft Objectives'. Your views are very important to us - if you wish to submit your comments on the 'draft objectives' please click on the tab titled  'Neighbourhood Plan Feedback' form.

Newmarket Neighbourhood Development Plan: Objectives 
This plan sets out seven objectives to be considered when determining land usage in our vision for Newmarket 2030. 
Objective 1: To promote and maintain the character of the town 
How: Further Detail:
Preserve and enhance the special character of Newmarket, including the town’s historic core and unique features arising from the Horseracing industry.
All new planning must recognise the importance of such assets, and we should seek opportunities to promote and develop them to the benefit of local residents and visitors. For instance: 
key buildings, monuments and views;
horse walks, training yards sited within the town centre, and the surrounding landscape of training grounds and stud farms.
Newmarket Neighbourhood Development Plan: Objectives 
This plan sets out seven objectives to be considered when determining land usage in our vision for Newmarket 2030. 
Objective 2: To ensure sustainable development within the boundary of the designated area
How: Further Detail:
2a) Housing
Ensure that any new housing development should be high-quality in design and materials. 
Review existing areas of housing which could be improved or redeveloped.
There should be easy pedestrian access to community facilities.
It should be compatible with climate change and suitable to meet residents’ whole-life needs.
2b) Sustainable Transport 
Travel within the town, particularly at crossing points, should be efficient and safe, balancing the needs of all users.
A network of attractive, clearly signed pedestrian and cycle loops should be established. 
The ‘Yellow Brick Road’ should be developed as a key green corridor.
Bus and rail services should be supported.
The horse walks should be enhanced.
These should allow integration of the town’s neighbourhoods and give access to green spaces, while minimising car usage.
For example, exploration of how they might be used for the benefit of the wider community.
Newmarket Neighbourhood Development Plan: Objectives 
This plan sets out seven objectives to be considered when determining land usage in our vision for Newmarket 2030. 
Objective 3: To ensure a vibrant town centre
How: Further Detail:
3a) Newmarket High Street is a major asset, with many attractive historic buildings, set against the backdrop of the Heath. The area should: 
Be well-presented, with attractive street furniture and appropriately designed shop fronts.
Be attractive to shoppers with pleasant walking loops and pedestrian-friendly crossings. 
Showcase entertainment/cultural venues. 
Maintain its compact shopping area and abundance of small traditional-style shop units. This major arterial route has brought travelers here for thousands of years; we should ensure that modern visitors also wish to stay and explore the town.
All these should be in keeping with the historic buildings we need to showcase.
E.g. cinema, live music, arts, library; we should build upon the town’s long history as a place of entertainment.
3b) Market 
The location and presentation of the market should aim to make it a focal point for residents and tourists alike.
Our town is named after its market, and any visitor to the town will naturally expect to find a thriving market.
3c) Information and Parking 
Better directions and background information for pedestrians and motorists should be structured around key landmarks and destinations.
A coherent town-centre parking strategy.
Key landmarks include:
Clock Tower, High Street, Railway Station and the new National Heritage Centre for Horseracing and Sporting Art.
This should cover on/off-street, long/short stay, number of spaces, location, pricing, signage and enforcement.
Newmarket Neighbourhood Development Plan: Objectives 
This plan sets out seven objectives to be considered when determining land usage in our vision for Newmarket 2030. 
Objective 4: To promote the town’s economy and employment
How: Further Detail:
4a) Sites
Existing employment sites should be kept for employment use where there is an identified need, and suitable sites should be developed to attract new employment use and investment, and be promoted to key business sectors and industries.
Encourage refurbishment and environmental improvements to existing employment sites.
All such sites should provide the right conditions for future growth over the short, medium and long term.
4b) Diversity
We should balance the needs of the horseracing industry with the requirement for a diverse and sustainable local economy by offering high-value jobs for those seeking employment unrelated to horseracing. 
In addition to horseracing, current businesses include retail, hospitality, entertainment, and local cuisine; we should also encourage a reputation for Mathematics and Computer science, emphasising local successes in these fields. 
The concept of ‘the Gateway to East Anglia’ should be used to co-ordinate the search for inward investment and the promotion of tourism.
4c) Education and Skills
We should ensure that our planning will: 
Support the provision of relevant skills for the town’s young people with relevant skills, in order to support a sustainable economy and meet local employment needs.
Encourage the availability of jobs for different skill sets in order to retain more of the skilled local workforce than at present and to raise local aspirations.
Local businesses should be encouraged to work with primary and secondary schools to improve attainment and aspirations, and to showcase different career paths available.
Newmarket Neighbourhood Development Plan: Objectives 
This plan sets out seven objectives to be considered when determining land usage in our vision for Newmarket 2030. 
Objective 5: To promote the town as a tourist destination
How: Further Detail:
We should aim to attract more visitors by enhancing the welcome they receive and the facilities we offer:
Easy-to-use parking.
Sufficient accommodation at different levels of affordability for overnight visitors. 
Celebrating our hotels, cafes, restaurants, pubs and theatres and encourage their enhancement. 
Highlighting Newmarket’s unique selling points: 
- The town’s role as the ‘Gateway to East Anglia’ 
- Horseracing
- Local Cuisine 
- History, Arts and Culture 
- Environment and Landscape 
Encouraging Tourism offers which can also be used by local residents. Hospitality has always been a key industry in Newmarket; we should build upon this by promoting the town as a major tourist centre. 
(Emphasising the easy access to and from other towns.)
Racecourses, National Heritage Centre for Horseracing and Sporting Art, National Stud, Tattersalls, Animal Health Trust.
Newmarket Sausage and Newmarket Cake.
National Heritage Centre for Horseracing and Sporting Art, Icknield Way, Devil’s Dyke, Town Centre.
Newmarket Heath, Warren Hill, Devil’s Dyke, flora and fauna.
The Market, a riding school.
Newmarket Neighbourhood Development Plan: Objectives 
This plan sets out seven objectives to be considered when determining land usage in our vision for Newmarket 2030. 
Objective 6: To value our environment
How: Further Detail:
We should ensure that our planning: 
Has minimum impact on the natural environment.
Promotes bio-diversity, and encourages wildlife. 
Values and guards its unique landscape. 
Promotes an understanding of how the town’s character and prosperity is dependent upon the surrounding landscape.
Allows residents and visitors access to the landscape wherever possible.
For example, working towards being carbon neutral and mitigating the expected effects of climate change.
In particular the chalk grassland of Newmarket Heath and the Devil’s Dyke, the unique flora and fauna of our SSSIs and the special features of the training grounds.
 
Newmarket Neighbourhood Development Plan: Objectives 
This plan sets out seven objectives to be considered when determining land usage in our vision for Newmarket 2030. 
Objective 7: To promote health and well-being
How: Further Detail:
We should ensure that our planning: 
Sustains the vitality, health and safety of the whole community, and enables disabled, elderly and infirm residents to remain part of it. 
Enables the formation of community hubs. 
Disperses open public spaces, allotments and children’s play areas throughout the town. 
Allows for enough sports facilities, to ensure that all our local teams can play their sport within Newmarket. 
Encourages diverse leisure opportunities.
Uses development agreements and potential donations to explore ways of improving existing and new landscape assets.
Allows voluntary, community and faith groups to flourish.
Fosters community cohesion not only by welcoming residents of all races, creeds, ages and backgrounds but also by creating and maintaining spaces where different communities can work together creatively so as to be a model for other towns.
For instance, breakfast clubs, after-school activities, youth work and adult education; these might use partnerships between Racing Welfare, the Racing Centre, Councils and Schools.
For example, sports pitches.